School Workshops


connecting young people to stories of difference is vital in fostering an environment that encourages diversity and acceptance.One of the aims of schools is to nurture the growth of students, both academically and socially.Having students participate in Bukjeh programs facilitates opportunities for this growth.

Individuals and in particular students are growing up in an ever-increasingly diverse world.Schools aim to create holistic learners, building on their personal, interpersonal and social knowledge and skills.

Our responsibility to facilitate experiences for students that nurture, challenge and educateCreate opportunities to teach empathy, respect and responsibilityApart from meeting a range of Humanities based strands in the Australian Curriculum, 'Intercultural Understanding' and 'Ethical Understanding' are two other important strands Bukjeh aims to address.

Having students participate in Bukjeh programs facilitates opportunities for this growth.

Individuals and in particular students are growing up in an ever-increasingly diverse world.

Schools aim to create holistic learners, building on their personal, interpersonal and social knowledge and skills.

Our responsibility to facilitate experiences for students that nurture, challenge and educate

Create opportunities to teach empathy, respect and responsibility

Apart from meeting a range of Humanities based strands in the Australian Curriculum, 'Intercultural Understanding' and 'Ethical Understanding' are two other important strands Bukjeh aims to address.

Workshops

Below are a list of workshops suitable for year 7 – 10.

Please See curriculum suitability tables to find out how this can be part of your class planning.

Telling Stories without words

In different situations we need to say things without words and use our bodies instead. Remember when you were talking to someone who was on the phone, how you said things to them without speaking? Or when you are far from someone, and they can’t hear you, or even when we need to keep in silence, because we are not allowed to speak in that place at that moment.

And also when talking to someone but you don’t understand what they say, because it is a different language…

Enjoy exploring the space that your own body can provide in telling a story using gestures, facial expressions, body shapes, symbols, movements, different qualities and rhythms. Even playing with our breath, and sounds without words, to find what we can share of our story using only our body.This workshop will build awareness of use of body language in students, who will be encouraged to create a story under the idea of Bukjeh (The sack - what they will take with them if they are asked to leave home right now) and Kheimeh (Home - what do students consider is their home).

Poetry and creative writing workshop

A creative writing workshop aimed at building student skills in poetry-writing. The workshop starts with the exploration of the definition of poetry. Students will be led to consider the audience and their origins and will be led to craft metaphors focusing on different types of displacement.

They will also be led to imagine a scenario of displacement from home and reflect on each other’s experiences of home through the use of poetry.

From Functional Emotional Anatomy to Performance Creativity  

A youth-friendly process into how emotions feel in our bodies, our minds, and how we might tell other people about how we feel. Facilitated by artist, Pepe, who combines his knowledge and practice in Performing Arts, psychology, movement, Yoga and Physical Therapy.

This activity will allow youth to connect, recognise and express some of the core emotions that could relate to Bukjeh.

At the same time, this experience will provide them with important life skills such as:

· Taking a mindful approach to connecting with their emotions

· how to articulate different reactions in different contexts

· building awareness towards themselves and to those who become part of their social contexts

Rhythms and composition in the body 

A workshop focusing on dance and the movement of the body, exploring different rhythms that originate from our body and expanding that quality into dance. Students will also connect using images, and their body in the space, to replicate and mix rhythms that are natural in our body.

The workshop facilitates participants to connect with themselves and to explore translating their different qualities into movement, adding personal layers into their creativities and becoming an author with their bodies, so that they can express their stories through those various art-forms.

Mini Bukjehs 

This workshop focuses on guiding students to consider and reflect on what they would take with them if they were ever forced to leave home.

Students are guided to record their reflections and will present their responses through making their own mini-bukjehs.

These mini-bukjehs carry their ideas and thoughts instead of physical objects and can be presented as part of a Bukjeh tent installation.

Letters to my new neighbour 

Students will be guided to write letters and encouraged to ask questions about new arrivals in the community in a safe, facilitated space. Lead artist, Aseel Tayah, will use these questions as the basis for a series of interviews with local new arrivals from the community and recording their responses to send back to the students.

Students will also hear stories of their neighbours in surrounding suburbs and some of the challenges they face to get settled in Australia.

Creating a welcoming home 

Students consider and reflect on what it takes to make a home through a hands-on activity. The workshop guides and prompts students to consider what it takes to create a welcoming home, for example:

· Do you build a shelter?

· Create a safe place to rest?

· What do you need?

· How do you do this when what you have at hand is very little?

Lead Artist, Aseel Tayah, will bring a suitcase full of everyday objects and invite children to think through a hands-on activity and use their architecture skills to design a home for new arrivals to their neighbourhood and within a given time-frame, consider what their most basic needs might be.

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